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Variantes

Bristol Bulldog

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Bulldog

Icon
Totals
2900 Precio
90 Supervivencia
1686 kgPeso
35.7 Daño
Speed
838.6 Velocidad en vuelo
300 km/hVel. máx. a nivel del mar
300 km/hVel. máx. a la mejor altura
700 mAltitud óptima
470 km/hVelocidad máxima en picado
65.6 m/sTasa de ascenso
70 km/hVelocidad de pérdida
237.5 km/hVelocidad en vuelo óptima
Mobility
85.4 Controlabilidad
8 sTiempo medio en girar 360 gra
100 °/sRégimen de alabeo
1517.7 Maniobrabilidad
II
Bristol Bulldog
2900
Sirvió en la British Royal Air Force entre 1929-1937. Se construyeron un total de 443 aviones.

Tech Tree

Motor
tree_wowp_ico-engine.pngI
0
MotorJupiter VII
Especificaciones:
Potencia del motor, cv450
Tipoenfriado por aire
Peso, kg330
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Jupiter VII
tree_wowp_ico-engine.pngII
175
MotorMercury IVS.2
Especificaciones:
Potencia del motor, cv560
Tipoenfriado por aire
Peso, kg438
Precio:
Coste de desarrollo175
Precio de compra1350
tree_wowp_ico-engine.pngII
175
Mercury IVS.2
tree_wowp_ico-engine.pngIII
225
MotorMercury VIS
Especificaciones:
Potencia del motor, cv605
Tipoenfriado por aire
Peso, kg438
Precio:
Coste de desarrollo225
Precio de compra4100
tree_wowp_ico-engine.pngIII
225
Mercury VIS
tree_wowp_ico-engine.pngIII
0
Motor
Especificaciones:
Potencia del motor, cv605
Tipoenfriado por aire
Peso, kg438
Aplicabilidad:Bristol Bulldog
tree_wowp_ico-engine.pngIII
Armazón del avión
tree_wowp_ico-planer.pngI
0
Armazón del aviónBulldog I
Especificaciones:
Supervivencia90
Peso, kg1296
Aplicabilidad:Bristol Bulldog
tree_wowp_ico-planer.pngI
Bulldog I
tree_wowp_ico-planer.pngII
160
Armazón del aviónBulldog IIa
Especificaciones:
Supervivencia100
Peso, kg1310
Precio:
Coste de desarrollo160
Precio de compra1700
Aplicabilidad:Bristol Bulldog
tree_wowp_ico-planer.pngII
160
Bulldog IIa
tree_wowp_ico-planer.pngII
0
Armazón del avión
Especificaciones:
Supervivencia100
Peso, kg1310
Aplicabilidad:Bristol Bulldog
tree_wowp_ico-planer.pngII
Ametralladora sincronizada
tree_wowp_ico-gun.pngI
0
Ametralladora.303 Vickers Mk.I (S)
Especificaciones:
Calibre7.7
Velocidad de salida, m/s960
Daño17
Tasa de fuego, disparos/min600
Peso, kg30
tree_wowp_ico-gun.pngI
2x.303 Vickers Mk.I (S)
tree_wowp_ico-gun.pngII
355
Ametralladora.303 Vickers Mk.II (S)
Especificaciones:
Calibre7.7
Velocidad de salida, m/s960
Daño21
Tasa de fuego, disparos/min600
Peso, kg30
Precio:
Coste de desarrollo355
Precio de compra2700
tree_wowp_ico-gun.pngII
355
2x.303 Vickers Mk.II (S)
tree_wowp_ico-gun.pngII
0
Ametralladora
Especificaciones:
Calibre7.7
Velocidad de salida, m/s960
Daño21
Tasa de fuego, disparos/min600
Peso, kg30
Precio:
Precio de compra2700
Aplicabilidad:Bristol Bulldog
tree_wowp_ico-gun.pngII
2x
tree_wowp_ico-.png
Sin armas
tree_wowp_ico-.png
Sin armas
tree_wowp_ico-.png
Sin armas


Modules

Motor

Motor

Nivel Motor Potencia del motor, cv / Empuje Tipo Peso, kg Precio,
I Jupiter VII 450 enfriado por aire 330 890
III Mercury VIS 605 enfriado por aire 438 4100
III 605 enfriado por aire 438 4100
Armazón del avión

Armazón del avión

Nivel Armazón del avión Supervivencia Peso, kg Precio,
I Bulldog I 90 1296 850
II Bulldog IIa 100 1310 1700
Ametralladora sincronizada

Ametralladora sincronizada

Nivel Ametralladora Calibre Velocidad de salida, m/s Daño Tasa de fuego, disparos/min Peso, kg Precio,
I .303 Vickers Mk.I (S) 7.7 960 17 600 30 0
II .303 Vickers Mk.II (S) 7.7 960 21 600 30 2700


Compatible Equipment

Compatible Consumables

Player Opinion

Pros and Cons

Pros:

Good turn rate. Easy to use and can be very versitile. Has the firepower to stay in a fight.


Historical Info

The design of the Bulldog was the outcome of a series of design studies for fighter undertaken by Frank Barnwell during the 1920s. In 1924 Barnwell had started work on a fighter powered by the Rolls-Royce Falcon to meet the requirements of specification F.17/24. The project was shelved since Bristol preferred to use their own engine designs, but was revived in 1926 when Barnwell started work on a gTdesign, designated the Bristol 102, to meet either F.9/26 for a day and night fighter or N.21/26 for a shipborne fighter. The Type 105 designation was first applied to a subsequent proposal for another aircraft to meet F.9/26 powered by the IMercury engine then under development at Bristol. These proposals looked promising enough for a pair of mock-ups to be constructed for inspection by the Air Ministry in February 1927. The two aircraft were similar in design, the interceptor to specification F.17/24 design being slightly smaller and lighter and not equipped with radio. As a result Bristol were asked to revise the design so that it met a later interceptor specification, F.20/27. Subsequently, a prototype aircraft, now designated the Type 107 Bullpup was ordered for evaluation, but the other design did not gain official backing. Nevertheless Bristol considered it promising enough to build a prototype to be entered for the F.9/26 trials as a private venture, powered by a Bristol Jupiter because the supply of Mercurys was expected to be limited.

The Type 105 was an unequal span single bay biplane powered by a supercharged Bristol Jupiter VII air-cooled radial engine driving a two-bladed propeller. The structure was all-metal with a fabric covering, using members built up from rolled high-tensile steel strips riveted together. In order to ensure the maximum field of view there was a large semi-circular cutout in the trailing edge of the upper wing and the inboard section of the lower was of reduced chord. Frise ailerons were fitted to the top wing only. It was armed with a pair of 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns mounted either side of the cockpit.

The prototype Bulldog first flew on 17 May 1927. Initial testing was entirely satisfactory and it was delivered to RAF Martlesham Heath in June. After initial consideration of all the types entered to meet the specification, the Bulldog and the Hawker Hawfinch were selected for more detailed evaluation. While the Bulldog's manoeuvrability and strength were praised by the RAF, it had poor spinning recovery properties. This was solved by fitting an enlarged fin and rudder, but this modification led to difficulties in taxying cross-wind.

Accordingly, a second prototype with a lengthened rear fuselage was ordered for further evaluation in comparison with the Hawfinch. In this form, designated the Type 105A or Bulldog Mk. II was first flown by Cyril Uwins on 21 January 1928 and shortly afterward, delivered to Martlesham Heath. Performance was so close to that of the Hawfinch that a decision was deferred until the aircraft had been evaluated by service pilots; the eventual choice of the Bulldog was made largely because it was easier to maintain. An initial contract for 25 aircraft was placed: Bristol accordingly laid down 26 airframes, the additional example being intended as a company demonstration aircraft. The first of these were delivered on 8 May 1929 and deliveries were complete by 10 October.

Later production aircraft were of a refined version designated the Mk. IIA. This had revised wing spars and a stronger fuselage and was powered by the uprated Jupiter VII F. One production aircraft was modified for use as an advanced trainer: after evaluation by the Central Flying School at Upavon this was ordered by the RAF, the production aircraft differing from the prototype in having slightly swept wings and an enlarged fin to improve spin recovery characteristics.

The Bulldog never saw combat with the RAF, although during the Abyssinia Crisis of 1935–36, Bristol Bulldogs were sent to the Sudan to reinforce Middle East Command. Douglas Bader, better known for his Second World War actions, lost both of his legs when his Bristol Bulldog crashed while he was performing unauthorised Aerobatics at Woodley airfield near Reading.

The Bulldog was withdrawn from RAF Fighter Command in July 1937, being primarily replaced by the Gloster Gauntlet. The Bulldog's RAF career was not over though, for the type continued to serve for a few years with Service Flying Training Schools.

The Bulldog proved to be quite a successful export to foreign air forces, seeing service with Australia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Japan, Latvia, Siam and Sweden.

In 1936, Latvia, keen to replace its elderly Bulldogs with more modern aircraft, sold 11 Bulldogs to Basque nationalist forces; becoming part of the Spanish Republican Air Force in the Spanish Civil War, they remained in use until the Battle of Santander. Ten Bulldogs also saw combat as part of the Finnish Air Force during the Winter War against the Soviet Union, which began in 1939. The Bulldogs fought well against their Soviet opponent, gaining six kills by five pilots for the loss of one of their own, the types shot down being two Polikarpov I-16s and four Tupolev SBs, both of which were superior in terms of technology compared to the Bulldog. The first aerial victory of the Finnish Air Force was achieved by a Bulldog piloted by SSgt Toivo Uuttu on 1 December 1939, over an I-16. The Bulldogs were used in advanced training during the subsequent Continuation War against the Soviet Union.


Historical Gallery

Sources and External Links

Fighters
USA IICurtiss P-23 IICurtiss XP-31 IIIBrewster F2A-1 Buffalo IIICurtiss Hawk 75M IIIBoeing YP-29 IVSeversky 2PA IVCurtiss Model 81A-1 IVCurtiss P-36 Hawk IVCurtiss P-36C Hawk IVGrumman XF4F-3 IVCurtiss XP-36F Hawk VBell XFL-1 Airabonita VCurtiss P-40 Warhawk VBell XP-77 VChance-Vought XF4U-1 VIBell P-39N-1 Airacobra VINorth American P-51A Mustang VICurtiss-Wright XP-55 Ascender VIINorth American P-51D Mustang VIIICurtiss XF15C VIIINorth American P-51H Mustang VIIILockheed P-80A Shooting Star IXVought F6U Pirate IXNorth American FJ-1 Fury IXMcDonnell XF-85 Goblin XNorth American F-86A Sabre
UK IIBristol Bulldog IIIBristol Type 133 IIIHawker P.V.3 IIISupermarine Type 224 IVBristol Type 146 IVFairey Fantome IVHawker Hurricane Mk. Ia VCAC CA-12 Boomerang VMiles M.20 VSupermarine Spitfire I VSupermarine Spitfire Mk Ia VVickers Venom VINorth American Mustang Mk.I VINorth American Mustang IA VISupermarine Spitfire V VISupermarine Spitfire Vb IM VIIGloster Meteor F. I VIISupermarine Spitfire IX VIIISupermarine Spitfire XIV IXSupermarine Attacker XSupermarine Swift
Germany IIArado Ar 67 IIArado Ar 68 IIFocke-Wulf Fw 56 Stosser IIHeinkel He 51 IIIArado Ar 80 IIIFocke-Wulf Fw 159 IVMesserschmitt Bf 109 B IVHeinkel He 112 VMesserschmitt Bf 109 E Emil VMesserschmitt Bf 109 E-3 VMesserschmitt Me 209 V4 VHeinkel He 100 D-1 VIMesserschmitt Bf 109 F Friedrich VISupermarine Spitfire V DB 605 VIIMesserschmitt Bf 109 G Gustav VIIIMesserschmitt Me 209 A VIIIHorten Ho 229 VIIIFocke-Wulf Ta 152 IXMesserschmitt Me P.1092 IXFocke-Wulf Ta 183 Huckebein XFocke-Wulf Fw 252 XMesserschmitt Me P.1101
USSR IITsKB I-7 IIIPolikarpov I-15bis DM-2 IIIPolikarpov TsKB-12bis IVPolikarpov I-153 DM-4 IVPolikarpov I-17 VPolikarpov I-180-3 VIlyushin I-21 (TsKB-32) VLavochkin LaGG-3 VMikoyan-Gurevich MiG-3 VYakovlev Yak-1 VIMikoyan-Gurevich I-210 VILavochkin La-5 VIBell P-39Q-15 Airacobra VIYakovlev Yak-1M VIIMikoyan-Gurevich I-220 VIIKostikov 302 VIILavochkin La-7 VIILavochkin La-9RD VIIYakovlev Yak-3 VIIYakovlev Yak-3RD VIIYakovlev Yak-3T VIIIMikoyan-Gurevich I-250 VIIILavochkin La-11 VIIILavochkin La-9 VIIIYakovlev Yak-15 IXLavochkin La-160 IXMikoyan-Gurevich MiG-9 IXYakovlev Yak-19 XLavochkin La-15 XMikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15bis XYakovlev Yak-30
China IICurtiss Hawk II IVNakajima Ki-43-Ic VCurtiss Tomahawk IIb VIINorth American P-51K Mustang VIIIShenyang JL-1A-37
Japan IINakajima A4N IIKawasaki Ki-10 IIKawasaki Ki-5 IINakajima Ki-8 IIIMitsubishi A5M IIIMitsubishi Ki-18 IIINakajima Ki-27 IIIMitsubishi Ki-33 IVMitsubishi A6M1 Zero IVNakajima Ki-43-I Hayabusa VMitsubishi A6M2 Zero VMitsubishi A6M3 (experimental) VNakajima Ki-43-II Hayabusa VIMitsubishi A6M5 Zero VIKawasaki Ki-61 Hien VIKawasaki Ki-88 VIIMitsubishi A7M Reppu VIINakajima Ki-84 Hayate VIIIMitsubishi J8M Shusui VIIITachikawa Ki-94-II IXTachikawa Ki-162-I XTachikawa Ki-162-III