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PJSD006 Hatsuharu 1945

PJSD006 Hatsuharu 1945

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Revision as of 08:24, 19 August 2015Revision as of 02:22, 22 September 2015
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 While the gun range upgrade is nice, you could save yourself 6000 exp towards the Fubuki if you decide to pass up the 0.9 increase in gun range. While the gun range upgrade is nice, you could save yourself 6000 exp towards the Fubuki if you decide to pass up the 0.9 increase in gun range.
  
?|History=The Hatsuharu-class destroyers were designed to accompany the Japanese main striking force and to conduct both day and night torpedo attacks against the United States Navy as it advanced across the Pacific Ocean, according to Japan's naval strategic projections. They were to be armed much as the Fubuki-class despite displacing only 1400 tons compared to the 1700 tons of the earlier destroyers. Furthermore their fire control systems were to be more modern than the older systems and suitable for anti-aircraft use. This required the gun turrets to be modified for high-angle fire, which also meant more powerful motors to traverse and elevate the guns more quickly to engage high-speed aircraft. The torpedo launchers were to be given a protective shield to allow for use in heavy weather and to protect against splinter damage. And the Hatsuharu vessels were to be fitted with modern, enclosed command spaces protected against strafing aircraft. These requirements could only be met by adding weight high up on the ship and increased the ship's center of gravity. The only way to adhere to the allotted displacement was to try to reduce the weight of the hull and other equipment below the waterline as much as possible. But this put the ship's designers in a no-win situation as any reduction of weight below the waterline further raised the ship's center of gravity and reduced her stability.<br />+|History=The Hatsuharu-class (初春) destroyers were designed to accompany the Japanese main striking force and to conduct both day and night torpedo attacks against the United States Navy as it advanced across the Pacific Ocean, according to Japan's naval strategic projections. They were to be armed much as the Fubuki-class despite displacing only 1400 tons compared to the 1700 tons of the earlier destroyers. Furthermore their fire control systems were to be more modern than the older systems and suitable for anti-aircraft use. This required the gun turrets to be modified for high-angle fire, which also meant more powerful motors to traverse and elevate the guns more quickly to engage high-speed aircraft. The torpedo launchers were to be given a protective shield to allow for use in heavy weather and to protect against splinter damage. And the Hatsuharu vessels were to be fitted with modern, enclosed command spaces protected against strafing aircraft. These requirements could only be met by adding weight high up on the ship and increased the ship's center of gravity. The only way to adhere to the allotted displacement was to try to reduce the weight of the hull and other equipment below the waterline as much as possible. But this put the ship's designers in a no-win situation as any reduction of weight below the waterline further raised the ship's center of gravity and reduced her stability.<br />
  
  

Revision as of 02:22, 22 September 2015





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Ship_PJSD006_Hatsuharu_1945.png
Overview
Credits.png Cost
Hit Points
Mobility
kt Max Speed
s Rudder Shift Time
m Turn Radius
Armor
- mm Hull Armor
- mm Citadel Armor
- mm Deck Armor
- mm Extremities Armor
Primary Armament
Guns
Secondary Armament
Guns
Torpedoes
Torpedoes
Aircrafts
Recon Squadrons
Visibility
km Aerial Detection Range
km Surface Detection Range


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Modules


Compatible Equipment


Player Opinion

Performance

After the fantastic Minekaze and Mutsuki destroyers, at first the Hatsuharu might feel like a bit of a let-down. Like the Mutsuki, it features 2 torpedo launchers of 3 torpedo tubes each, but it also features a worse detection range (can be spotted nearly 1km further away), is slower again, and has a longer rudder shift time. While the stock torpedoes hit hard, the Hatsuharu really comes into its own once you get the upgraded torpedoes. Featuring significant speed over the stock torpedoes, the upgraded torpedoes give the enemy ship less time to react and dodge, resulting in more hits (in comparison to stock). It can still drop torpedoes undetected, however you really have to be careful when facing other destroyers as they can possibly detect you before you detect them. Moreover, Hatsuharu's guns are a significant improvement over her predecessor. With two (comparatively) faster-turning dual high-velocity 12.7cm, the Hatsuharu's shells hit harder, are more accurate, fly faster and follow a much flatter trajectory than the Mutsuki and Minekaze's low-velocity 12cm. While US DDs continue to hold the lead in raw rate of fire, IJN DD players can for the first time fight off overeager Sims with the Hatsuharu. IJN DD guns from Hatsuharu on until the Kagero have significantly better shell velocity and arc. Engage US DDs at midrange (8km - 10km) to maximize your advantages and mitigate your weaknesses in a gunfight.

Pros

  • Improved guns gain significantly increased accuracy, range, turn speed and power
  • Relatively low detection range (in comparison to most ships)
  • Devastating torpedo damage for its tier (3 torpedo hits can cripple a same tier Battleship)
  • Decent torpedo speed makes it harder to dodge

Cons

  • Longer detection range than most destroyers means you get spotted easier
  • Cruiser-like top speed
  • Turret traverse and rate of fire remain inferior to USN DD guns.
  • Poor armor indicative of IJN Destroyers


Early Research

Like with all IJN Destroyers, the torpedoes are the primary armament followed by the guns as secondary. It is recommended that you first focus on getting the upgraded torpedoes in order to maximize your hit chances. While it does sacrifice ROF a little bit, and removes 1 gun (as you must get the hull upgrade), as stated earlier the increased torpedo speed is worth it.

While the gun range upgrade is nice, you could save yourself 6000 exp towards the Fubuki if you decide to pass up the 0.9 increase in gun range.


Historical Info

The Hatsuharu-class (初春) destroyers were designed to accompany the Japanese main striking force and to conduct both day and night torpedo attacks against the United States Navy as it advanced across the Pacific Ocean, according to Japan's naval strategic projections. They were to be armed much as the Fubuki-class despite displacing only 1400 tons compared to the 1700 tons of the earlier destroyers. Furthermore their fire control systems were to be more modern than the older systems and suitable for anti-aircraft use. This required the gun turrets to be modified for high-angle fire, which also meant more powerful motors to traverse and elevate the guns more quickly to engage high-speed aircraft. The torpedo launchers were to be given a protective shield to allow for use in heavy weather and to protect against splinter damage. And the Hatsuharu vessels were to be fitted with modern, enclosed command spaces protected against strafing aircraft. These requirements could only be met by adding weight high up on the ship and increased the ship's center of gravity. The only way to adhere to the allotted displacement was to try to reduce the weight of the hull and other equipment below the waterline as much as possible. But this put the ship's designers in a no-win situation as any reduction of weight below the waterline further raised the ship's center of gravity and reduced her stability.


The weight of the hull could generally be reduced by using higher grades of steel that were lighter and smaller for the same strength, reducing dimensions, particularly length, or using advanced construction techniques like welding that saved weight over the conventional riveting. The Japanese used the same high tensile steel for the Hatsuharu class as they did for the older destroyers and chose not to increase the power of the turbines and boilers to achieve the desired high speed, but lengthened the hull to offset the reduced power of the light-weight machinery. The beam was increased to counter some of the extra top-weight, but the draft was reduced to reduce hull resistance, which also reduced stability by lessening the area of the hull beneath the waterline in comparison to the area above it, which was subject to pressure from the wind. Electric welding was extensively used to reduce weight although it was at an early stage of development in Japan and was still problematic.

Extensive weight-saving measures were used during the design and construction of the hull. More frames of lighter construction were spaced more closely together to reduce the thickness of the hull plating and the extensive use of welding (only the longitudinal strength members and a few other parts were riveted) were some of the techniques utilized to reduce hull weight by 66.5 tonnes (65.4 long tons; 73.3 short tons) in comparison to the Fubuki class. The Hatsuharu vessels were some 10 metres (32 ft 10 in) shorter than the Fubuki class vessels, but weighed 4.9 tonnes (4.8 long tons; 5.4 short tons) per 1 metre (3.3 ft) of hull length compared to the latter's 5.09 tonnes (5.01 long tons; 5.61 short tons) per 1 metre (3.3 ft).

The Hatsuharu-class ships were shorter than their predecessors, at 109.5 m (359 ft 3 in) overall. The ships had a beam of 10 metres and at full load a draft of 3.35 m (11 ft 0 in). Despite the emphasis on weight-saving during construction, the ships were significantly overweight as completed and displaced 1,530 metric tons (1,510 long tons) at standard load, and 1,981 metric tons (1,950 long tons) at full load, nearly 130 metric tons (100 long tons) more than planned.

The hull of the Hatsuharu-class vessels retained the general configuration of the Fubuki-class destroyers with a long forecastle and a pronounced flare of the forecastle to improve sea-keeping at high speeds by adding buoyancy and reducing the spray and water coming over the deck. A large bridge structure was located at the aft end of the forecastle deck topped by four fire control stations of various types. Lowest, just above the compass bridge, was the torpedo director (Hassha shikisho), with the gunnery fire direction station (Shageki shikisho) next above. The fire director tower (Hōiban shagekito) was third from the bottom and behind it was the 3 m (9 ft 10 in) rangefinder. Each of these was protected by 10 mm (0.39 in) plates of Dücol steel against strafing and shell splinters.

For the first time in a Japanese destroyer a superfiring turret was fitted forward of the bridge. It was only a single gun Model A turret, to save weight high in the ship, and was mounted on a deckhouse to elevate it above the twin gun Model B Mod 2 (B-gata kai-2) turret mounted on the forecastle deck. The second twin gun turret was mounted at the rear of the ship on the main deck. These turrets were slightly heavier than the earlier Model A and Model B turrets fitted on the Fubukis. All turrets were fitted with the 12.7 cm (5.0 in) Type 3 gun.

The uptakes of the two forward boiler rooms were trunked together aft of the break in the forecastle into the fore funnel while the rear boiler room exhausted into the smaller rear funnel. Both funnels were inclined to the rear to reduce the amount of smoke that might reach the bridge. A tripod mast was fitted between the bridge and the fore funnel. Between the two funnels was the forward 61 centimetres (24 in) triple torpedo tube mount fitted on a low platform. Behind it "was a torpedo locker with its mechanical quick reload system (Kiryoku sōtenshiki jihatsu sōten sochi) for the three reserve torpedoes inside."[7] To preserve lateral stability the aft funnel was offset to starboard while the torpedo mount was offset to port. The reload locker was also offset slightly to port and angled inboard to facilitate reloading. The middle torpedo mount was positioned behind the aft funnel on the centerline, but its reload locker was positioned identically to that of the forward mount. Superimposed to starboard and overlapping the middle mount was the rear triple torpedo mount positioned on the rear deckhouse. Immediately behind the mount was its locker positioned on the centerline, but angled slightly to the right so that its mount only had to traverse slightly to align with the locker and begin reloading. This was the first ship in history to be fitted with superimposed torpedo tubes, made necessary by the designer's insistence on fitting nine torpedo tubes despite the Navy's requirement for only six.

A small platform that carried a 2 m (6 ft 7 in) rangefinder was mounted above the rear torpedo locker and a 90 cm (2 ft 11 in) searchlight was mounted on a tower behind the rear funnel. The two license-built Vickers 40 mm (1.6 in) (pom pom) anti-aircraft guns were mounted on an elevated platform at the front of the rear funnel. Curiously they were another case where the designer exceeded the requirements laid down by the Navy.

General Characteristics:

Type: Destroyer
Displacement: 1,530 t (1,510 long tons)
Length: 109.5 m (359 ft 3 in) overall
Beam: 10 m (32 ft 10 in)
Draught: 3.38 m (11 ft 1 in)
Installed power: 42,000 shp (31,000 kW)3 water-tube boilers
Propulsion: 2 shafts; 2 Kampon steam turbines
Speed: 36 knots (67 km/h; 41 mph)
Range: 4,000 nmi (7,400 km; 4,600 mi) @ 14 knots (26 km/h; 16 mph)
Complement: 212

Armament:

  • 2 × twin, 1 × single Type 3 127 mm 50 caliber naval guns
  • 2 × single 40 mm AA guns
  • 3 × triple 610 mm (24 in) torpedo tubes
  • 18 × depth charges


Historical Gallery

Sources and External Links

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