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PJSD007 Fubuki 1944

PJSD007 Fubuki 1944

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Revision as of 22:07, 12 September 2015
fixing grammar
Revision as of 02:24, 22 September 2015
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?The resultant Fubuki class was ordered under the 1923 fiscal year budget, with ships completed between 1926 and 1931. Their performance was a great improvement over previous destroyer designs, so much so that they were designated Special Type destroyers. The large size, powerful engines, high speed, large radius of action, and unprecedented armament gave these destroyers the firepower similar to many light cruisers in other navies.+The resultant Fubuki class (吹雪) was ordered under the 1923 fiscal year budget, with ships completed between 1926 and 1931. Their performance was a great improvement over previous destroyer designs, so much so that they were designated Special Type destroyers. The large size, powerful engines, high speed, large radius of action, and unprecedented armament gave these destroyers the firepower similar to many light cruisers in other navies.
  
 The Fubuki-class vessels were originally intended to only have hull numbers due to the projected large number of warships the Japanese Navy expected to build through the Eight-eight fleet plan. This proved to be extremely unpopular with the crews and was a constant source of confusion in communications with the earlier Kamikaze and Mutsuki-classes, and naval policy was changed in August 1928. Hence, the Fubuki-class vessels were assigned names as they were launched. The Fubuki-class vessels were originally intended to only have hull numbers due to the projected large number of warships the Japanese Navy expected to build through the Eight-eight fleet plan. This proved to be extremely unpopular with the crews and was a constant source of confusion in communications with the earlier Kamikaze and Mutsuki-classes, and naval policy was changed in August 1928. Hence, the Fubuki-class vessels were assigned names as they were launched.

Revision as of 02:24, 22 September 2015





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Ship_PJSD007_Fubuki_1944.png
Overview
Credits.png Cost
Hit Points
Mobility
kt Max Speed
s Rudder Shift Time
m Turn Radius
Armor
- mm Hull Armor
- mm Citadel Armor
- mm Deck Armor
- mm Extremities Armor
Primary Armament
Guns
Secondary Armament
Guns
Torpedoes
Torpedoes
Aircrafts
Recon Squadrons
Visibility
km Aerial Detection Range
km Surface Detection Range


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Modules


Compatible Equipment


Player Opinion

Performance

The chronological predecessor of the Hatsuharu, the Fubuki-class nevertheless remains an upgrade over its compact and downsized successor. With three sets of double high-velocity 12.7cm guns (Two in superfiring position in the rear), the Fubuki-class' accuracy and range make gunfights with its American equivalents a viable, if exceedingly dangerous option. While its visibility is a downgrade from the Hatsuharu, the Fubuki can mount the concealment improvement modifications made available from tier 8 on, significantly reducing its visibility to 6.3km. Combined with three triple torpedo launchers which upgrade to launch 15km torpedoes, the Fubuki presents the most dramatic improvement to IJN DD capabilities since the Minekaze.

Fubuki's strengths and weaknesses remain largely the same as its predecessors, albeit reduced - it remains at a significant disadvantage against US DDs in a close-range gunfight, though its accuracy and low shell travel time allow it to hold its own at range. Its turrets, like the Hatsuharu's (and unlike the single turrets of USN DDs and lower-tier IJN DDs), are ponderously slow in turning and prone to being knocked out and are frighteningly fragile under fire thanks to the weak armor common to all DDs. In keeping with the trend since the Minekaze, the Fubuki is also slightly slower. Fubuki inherits Hatsuharu's improved torpedoes, but can upgrade for a 50% increase in range in exchange for slightly decreased speed. As in-game detection is dependent on torpedo speed, this handicaps the Fubuki less than one might think. Combined with a third launcher, the Fubuki can launch thick carpets of torpedoes its predecessors and American equivalents can't match or retain the third set for emergencies. Do not, however, take the increased range to mean that the Type 90s are most effective at 15km. Combined with its slower speed and greater travel distance, even tight spreads launched from 15km can become spread out to the point of being easily avoidable. The Fubuki's torpedos are still best launched at the very edge of detection range - like the Minekaze's 10km torpedos, the extra range only allows a bit of flex room for the well-protected BB or unexpected circumstance. Combined with the lessons learned from the Mutsuki and Hatsuharu, the Fubuki represents the high point for the post-Minekaze IJN DD playstyle, combining usable guns with potent torpedo armament.

Pros

  • Accurate, high-velocity and long-ranged guns
  • Detection range improves significantly over Hatsuharu with appropriate mods
  • Flexible 3x3 torpedo setup
  • 15km torpedo range allows greater versatility and opens the possibility of long-range launches

Cons

  • Stock detection range represents a downgrade from the Hatsuharu
  • Continued deterioration in top speed
  • Inferior ROF and gun traverse compared to USN.
  • Fragile turrets combined with low armor overall.


Historical Info

After the end of World War I, the Imperial Japanese Navy General Staff issued requirements for a destroyer with a maximum speed of 39 knots, range of 4000 nautical miles at 14 knots, and armed with large numbers of the recently developed Type 8 torpedoes. These destroyers were intended to operate with the new series of fast and powerful new cruisers also under consideration as part of a program intended to give the Imperial Japanese Navy a qualitative edge with the world's most modern ships.


The resultant Fubuki class (吹雪) was ordered under the 1923 fiscal year budget, with ships completed between 1926 and 1931. Their performance was a great improvement over previous destroyer designs, so much so that they were designated Special Type destroyers. The large size, powerful engines, high speed, large radius of action, and unprecedented armament gave these destroyers the firepower similar to many light cruisers in other navies.

The Fubuki-class vessels were originally intended to only have hull numbers due to the projected large number of warships the Japanese Navy expected to build through the Eight-eight fleet plan. This proved to be extremely unpopular with the crews and was a constant source of confusion in communications with the earlier Kamikaze and Mutsuki-classes, and naval policy was changed in August 1928. Hence, the Fubuki-class vessels were assigned names as they were launched.

The closest equivalents in the United States Navy were the Porter- and Somers-class destroyers, of which only thirteen vessels were constructed in the 1930s to function as destroyer squadron leaders.

Design:

The initial design for the Fubuki class was based on a 2000 ton displacement hull with a single 12.7 cm (5.0 in) battery, two twin 24-inch torpedo tubes (just introduced in Mutsuki), and capable of 40 knots (74 km/h). Following the abandonment of the Washington Naval Treaty from 1923, the design was modified to 1680 standard tons with more guns and more torpedo tubes. However, their increased displacement more than offset their more powerful engines, resulting in a slower top speed than originally planned.

The main battery consisted of six Type 3 127 mm 50 caliber naval guns, mounted in pairs in three weather-proof, splinter-proof, gas-tight gun turrets which were far ahead of their time. On the last 14 vessels of the series, these guns were dual purpose guns which could be elevated to 70 degrees, making them the world's first destroyers with this ability. Ammunition was brought up on hoists from magazines located directly underneath each gun turret, which have a far greater rate of fire than other contemporary destroyers, where ammunition was typically manually loaded.

Unlike the earlier Minekaze series destroyers, the Fubuki did not have a forecastle break containing the forward torpedo launchers. Instead, the forward launchers were located between the siamesed smokestacks. Originally Type 8 torpedoes were carried, arranged in three triple mountings. To increase comfort and combat ability even in bad weather, the forecastle was raised, and the bridge enlarged and enclosed. The bow was given a significant flare, to offer protection against weather in the Pacific.

Between June 1928 and March 1933, twenty-four Fubuki-class destroyers were built, in three groups. As completed, Fubuki had twin 5-inch guns in "A", "X", and "Y" positions, with triple torpedo tubes in "D", "P", and "Q", making them the most powerful destroyers in the world at the time of their completion.

Development:

The first group, or Fubuki class, consisted of the first ten vessels completed in 1928 and 1929, were simpler in construction than the vessels that followed. They had a rangefinder on the compass bridge, an exposed gun-fire control room, and were equipped with a “Type A” gun turret that only elevate both of its barrels at the same time and only to 40 degrees. The first group can be distinguished from later ships by their lack of ventilators atop the stacks.

The second group, or Ayanami class, were built in 1930 and 1931, and had larger bridges which encompassed the rangefinder, an azimuth compass sighting device, the gun-fire control room, as well as a range finding tower. Furthermore, the boiler room's air inlet was changed from a pipe to a bowl shape. They also benefited from the deployment of “Type B” turrets, which could elevate each gun separately to 75° for AA use, making them the world's first destroyers with this capability.

The third group, also known as the Akatsuki class, were built from 1931 to 1933. These vessels had larger boilers and a narrower fore funnel. Improvements included a unique splinter-proof torpedo launcher-turret, which allowed the torpedo launcher tubes to be reloaded in action (something which Western destroyers still did not have in the 1990s).

However, the Fubuki class also had a number of inherent design problems. The large amount of armament combined with a smaller hull displacement than in the original design created issues with stability. After the Tomozuru Incident, in which the top-heavy design of many Japanese warships called basic design issues into question, additional ballast had to be added. In the Fourth Fleet Incident, during which a typhoon damaged virtually every ship in the Fourth Fleet, issues with the longitudinal strength of the Fubuki-class hull was discovered. As a result, all vessels were reconstructed between 1935 and 1937. This increased the displacement to 2050 tons standard tons and over 2400 tons full load. The rebuild reduced the top speed slightly.

During World War II, as surviving vessels returned to the Japanese home islands for repair and refit, the anti-aircraft armament was steadily upgraded. In 1945, the "X" turret was replaced on surviving vessels to create space and lighten the top for the addition of 14 -Type 96 25 mm AT/AA Guns, two additional 13 mm anti-aircraft machine guns, 18 more depth charges, and radar were installed.

General Characteristics:

Type: Destroyer
Displacement: 1,750 long tons (1,780 t) standard 2,050 long tons (2,080 t) re-built
Length: 111.96 m (367.3 ft) pp, 115.3 m (378 ft) waterline 118.41 m (388.5 ft) overall
Beam: 10.4 m (34 ft 1 in)
Draft: 3.2 m (10 ft 6 in)
Propulsion: 2 shaft Kampon geared turbines 4 (Groups I & II) or 3 (Group III) boilers 50,000 hp (37,000 kW)
Speed: 38 knots (44 mph; 70 km/h)
Range: 5,000 nmi (9,300 km) at 14 knots (26 km/h)
Complement: 219


Armament:

  • 6 × Type 3 127 mm 50 caliber naval guns (3 × 2)
  • 2 × Type 93 13mm machine guns (2 × 1)
  • 9 × 610 mm (24 in) torpedo tubes (3 × 3)
  • 18 × 8th Year Type torpedoes (later replaced to the Type 90 torpedo), 18 × depth charges


Historical Gallery

Sources and External Links

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