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Ships of Pan-Asia

Ships of Pan-Asia

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Revision as of 22:15, 1 October 2017Revision as of 04:04, 3 October 2017
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 {{AnnoWiki {{AnnoWiki
 |icon= |icon=
?|content=[[File:Wows flag Pan Asia.png|frameless|left|link=]]The Pan-Asia faction does not cover a specific nation, but includes ships from various nations within the Asia-Pacific region. Ships from five navies are currently represented in World of Warships: China, Taiwan, South Korea, Indonesia, and Thailand. In-game, each ship flies the individual jack of their respective navy (as shown below).+|content=[[File:Wows flag Pan Asia.png|frameless|left|link=]]The Pan-Asia faction does not cover a specific nation, but includes ships from various nations within the Asia-Pacific region. Ships from five navies are currently represented in World of Warships: China, Republic of China (Taiwan), South Korea, Indonesia, and Thailand. In-game, each ship flies the individual jack of their respective navy (as shown below).
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 [[File:Wows flag China.png|68px|frameless|left|link=]][[Image:Ship_PZSC506_Huang_he.png|frame|right|link=Ship:Huang He|PLAN ''Huang He'', Tier VI cruiser]]Formally organized in September 1950, the '''People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN)''' was initially built upon units that defected from the Republic of China Navy during the Chinese Civil War. Nominally a branch of the People's Liberation Army, their subordinate status to their ground-pounding brethren led to a variety of growing pains.  [[File:Wows flag China.png|68px|frameless|left|link=]][[Image:Ship_PZSC506_Huang_he.png|frame|right|link=Ship:Huang He|PLAN ''Huang He'', Tier VI cruiser]]Formally organized in September 1950, the '''People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN)''' was initially built upon units that defected from the Republic of China Navy during the Chinese Civil War. Nominally a branch of the People's Liberation Army, their subordinate status to their ground-pounding brethren led to a variety of growing pains.

Revision as of 04:04, 3 October 2017

Wows_flag_Pan_Asia.png
The Pan-Asia faction does not cover a specific nation, but includes ships from various nations within the Asia-Pacific region. Ships from five navies are currently represented in World of Warships: China, Republic of China (Taiwan), South Korea, Indonesia, and Thailand. In-game, each ship flies the individual jack of their respective navy (as shown below).
Wows_flag_China.png
PLAN Huang He, Tier VI cruiser
Formally organized in September 1950, the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) was initially built upon units that defected from the Republic of China Navy during the Chinese Civil War. Nominally a branch of the People's Liberation Army, their subordinate status to their ground-pounding brethren led to a variety of growing pains.


Early expansion in the 1950's was primarily the result of purchasing hand-me-down frigates and destroyers from the Soviet Navy while the People's Republic of China developed shipbuilding and naval architecture skills from within its own borders (with Soviet assistance). The PLAN remained largely focused on littoral and riverine combat until the late 1980s and the break-up of the Soviet Union. China's more prominent role in world — and naval — affairs in the years hence has led to explosive growth of the modern PLAN and development of green water capabilities that continue to expand today. The PLAN operates at least one modern aircraft carrier — purchased as surplus from the Russian Federation Navy — while developing their own carrier construction program; they launched their first nuclear ballistic missile submarine in 1981, and continue to progress improvements to their own designs of surface vessels and submarines.


Wows_flag_ROC.png
ROCN Loyang, Tier VIII destroyer
The roots of the Republic of China Navy (ROCN) date back to 1912 and the establishment of the Ministry of the Navy, following the fall of the Qing Dynasty and subsequent creation of the Republic of China. The ROCN remained loyal to the Kuomintang government throughout the political chaos of the late teens and 1920's, and maintained a focus on river patrols and littoral combat, knowing it was unable to challenge the might of the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) at sea.


Their meager forces devastated in the opening days of the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937, the ROCN effectively ceased to exist again until the close of World War II. Re-constituted and bolstered by the transfer of decommissioned ships from Allied navies — and captured ships from the IJN — the ROCN was again decimated by Chinese internal politics, as some units defected to support Communist forces during the Chinese Civil War that broke out in March 1946. Loyal ROCN units were instrumental in assisting with and protecting the evacuation of over a million refugees from mainland China to the island of Taiwan in October 1949 following the defeat of Chiang Kai-shek's Chinese Nationalist forces at the hands of Mao Zedong's Communists.

Much to the irritation of the People's Republic of China, Western navies — such as the United States Navy — quickly developed relations with the exiled armed forces of the Republic of China and have supported them in the decades since. Transfers of technology and materiel have kept the ROCN modern and relevant as concerns developed in the early 1990's around the PLAN's ability to potentially blockade the island. Local shipbuilding lacks the capability to deliver submarines, but has successfully built and commissioned a mix of frigates, corvettes, and local patrol vessels into ROCN service. Combined with a mix of surplus vessels purchased from the United States, France, Germany, and the Netherlands, the modern ROCN continues to pursue a mission of local littoral control and anti-blockade measures in the shadow of an expanding PLAN.


Wows_flag_South_Korea.png
ROKN Chung Mu, Tier IX destroyer
Republic of Korea Navy










Wows_flag_Indonesia.png
KRI Gadjah Mada, Tier VII destroyer
Founded on 10 September 1945 — during the opening days of the Indonesian National Revoultion — the Republic of Indonesia Navy was initially comprised primarily of Indonesian sailors with experience serving in the Royal Dutch Navy.










Wows_flag_Thailand.png
RTNS Phra Ruang, Tier III destroyer
Following conflicts with both the British Empire and France — who occupied neighboring countries — Siam began to reorganize its military in the latter portion of the 19th century. The Royal Thai Navy (RTN) was founded in 1875, when it was originally known, of course, as the Royal Siamese Navy. Despite royal backing, the RTN was without modern warships until the conclusion of World War I, when Siamese citizens donated money for King Mongkut to purchase a state-of-art R-class destroyer — HMS Radiant — from the Royal Navy. Re-named and commissioned into her new navy, RTNS Phra Ruang was the first state-of-art warship that saw service with the RTN.


Siam later placed orders with Japanese shipyards for the construction of two coastal monitors, two submarines, and number of destroyers. These ships were involved in the 1932 coup that transformed the absolute monarchy of Siam into the constitutional monarchy of Thailand, as well as the Franco-Thai War, which saw Thailand take advantage of the fall of France in 1940 to reclaim territory lost to the French during the conflicts of the 19th century. The conclusion of the Franco-Thai War was mediated by Japan, and the treaty signed in Tokyo on 9 May 1941. Barely seven months later, Japan invaded and subjugated Thailand, forcing her government to declare war on the Allied powers in January 1942.

The conclusion of World War II brought additional political turmoil to southeast Asia; the withdrawal of the Japanese and the weakening of colonial European forces left room for many countries to undergo significant leadership changes. Backed by the Soviet Union and China, communist ideology began to expand throughout the Indochina peninsula. With the aid of the United States, Thailand was able to resist communist influence and join the United Nations, allowing units of the RTN to participate in both the Korean and Vietnam Wars (in cooperation with South Korea and South Vietnam, respectively).

Today, the modern RTN continues to develop their overall capabilities, and is notable as the only southeast Asian nation to operate an aircraft carrier. Like their counterparts in Taiwan, local shipbuilding also has the ability to deliver modern frigates and destroyers without the need to purchase them from Western navies.

Destroyers

Ship_PZSD106_Fu_Shun.png
VI Fushun
Ship_PZSD506_Anshan.png
VI Anshan  Doubloons
Ship_PZSD108_Hsien_Yang.png
VIII Hsienyang
Ship_PZSD208_Siliwangi_1959.png
VIII Siliwangi  Doubloons
Ship_PZSD508_LoYang.png
VIII Loyang  Doubloons

Cruisers

Ship_PZSC506_Huang_he.png
VI Huanghe  Doubloons
Ship_PZSC508_Irian.png
VIII Irian  Doubloons
Ship_PZSC518_Martel_Wukong.png
VIII Wukong  Doubloons

Battleships

Ship_PZSB509_Izumo_Bajie.png
IX Bajie  Doubloons
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